lmpandora:


"That was decades ago, Cecil! Anyway, we want to know what we can do to keep your business. We here at StrexCorp Synernists, Inc. are dedicated to the betterment of life through branding, social networking, and upbeat music."

Really wanted to draw this duo, and I have a feeling that they really loathe each other deep inside :p

lmpandora:

"That was decades ago, Cecil! Anyway, we want to know what we can do to keep your business. We here at StrexCorp Synernists, Inc. are dedicated to the betterment of life through branding, social networking, and upbeat music."

Really wanted to draw this duo, and I have a feeling that they really loathe each other deep inside :p

(Source: veglawyer, via kizamon)

gradnessmadness:

“You can fix anything but a blank page.” 

― Nora Roberts

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

madelinelime:

When I was a kid I thought your 20s were supposed to be fun, not filled with perpetual anxiety about financial stability and constantly feeling like an unaccomplished piece of shit. 

That’s because it was fun for baby boomers and they basically gave us this impression it would always be like that, but then they ruined the economy.

(Source: curseofthefanartlords, via periwinklegeo)

For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

So not that I assume anyone cares or notices, but I’ve been on a bit of a forced hiatus from tumblr. I got a job. I moved out. I’ve been traveling. 

What the actual heck!? It’s like my life is moving forward. And that is majorly cool. 

I have my vintagey studio apartment on the beach. I get to take trips to Boston every month. And the price is that I have to spend all day being an insurance lady. Or learning to be an insurance lady. And that is pretty rough. Not at all what I thought I would be doing a year ago.  

But today, when I passed my first Associate Underwriting test I almost lost my mind. It was so hard and stressful. And I passed. Like a boss. 

Life was trending down for a while, but I think it might be trending up right now. Which is a surprise. A great one, and I am super thankful for all the cool things going on right now. 

Life. It’s freaky weird. 

Both.
I want to stay.
I want to leave.
I am three oceans away from my soul.
Nayyirah Waheed  (via itscherryamber)

(Source: nayyirahwaheed, via kizamon)

(Source: larimii, via kizamon)

Sam Smith Like I Can
[Flash 9 is required to listen to audio.]
38983 Plays
The early suffragists, the women who fought for and eventually won for women the right to vote, were also characterized as unlovely, irritating women. Looking back at their struggles, we may wonder what all the fuss was about—why was there so much resistance to something that now seems so reasonable, so normal? But if we had been there at the time, would we have been distancing ourselves from them, saying things like, “I’m not one of those suffragists, but I do support women’s right to vote,” just as many people now say, “I’m not a feminist, but I do believe that women and men should be equal”?
Hilary M. Lips, A New Psychology of Women (via marinashutup)

(via morbidlyfit)

// We Are Family//

copperbadge:

Mum brought me a potted aloe vera succulent for housewarming. I told her I was calling it Ragtime.

"Ragtime?" she asked.

"Yeah," I said. "Aloe, my Ragtime gal."

I’d say she disowned me, but she was laughing too hard.

(via kizamon)

The name is Shruti. Global citizen in the making